Strategic Outreach

Managing Change Via Communications

Employee Integration After Acquisition – the Communications Factor

Underestimate the impact of an acquisition on the employees of the acquired organization at your own risk and peril. Just because an employee will continue to do their same job after integration, doesn’t mean that things don’t change in their work world. Often it’s dozens of things – their health & welfare benefits, retirement savings, life insurance, pay date and other HR services (or HR self-service). Their email, information and collaboration networks probably change also. Angst festers due to uncertainty, as employees wonder if their role will continue long-term within the new organization, especially if it’s a larger, more complex organization.

As your people move from being an employee of Company A to an employee of Conglomerate ABC, well-strategized communications are needed to avoid confusion, skepticism and negative perceptions about the change. This series of blog posts will explain what worked for us during the integration of 1,280 clinicians and support staff, plus about 900 affiliated physicians, at a prestigious hospital that became a part of our 33 hospital, 5-state health care system.    

The Kick-Off Strategy – Spell Out What’s Changing, and What’s Not

It is imperative to kick off the integration with a substantive communication from executive leadership that spells out what’s changing, and what’s not changing for the employee. Do this before the integration begins impacting everyone. Effective sponsorship of the change requires multiple levels of management to be actively supportive and involved, but the process starts with executive leaders. They need to not only endorse the change initiative, but also communicate its importance and the resources they have ensured are behind it.

Allow as much lead time as possible to prepare this communication. Timing is tricky – it’s a balance between getting it out early enough to alleviate staff angst and confusion, and late enough that most change factors and go-live timeframes have been solidified to make it as meaningful and helpful as possible.

The emphasis in all communications to managers and staff groups should be on the positive outcome and future for both organizations, but there should be acknowledgement of the challenges and short-term inconvenience during the change. Transparency is key.

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November 25, 2014 Posted by | Acquisition Communications, Change Management, Corporate Communications, Employee Integration | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment