Strategic Outreach

Managing Change Via Communications

Communications during integration of hospitals and medical groups: Lessons Learned

Here’s what I’ve learned from directing internal communications to manager and all-employee levels during integration of their hospital or medical group organization into our large health care system.  I’ve done two of each.

  • Develop an over-arching communication plan incorporating all HR, IT and other work streams to ensure consistent messaging to impacted populations (theme, tone, format, terminology).
    • Emphasize positive outcome/future for both organizations
    • Acknowledge short-term inconvenience during change (transparency)
    • Establish channel/vehicle for regular updates to leaders/managers
  • Use a consistent message structure that clarifies what will not change, what will change “now” (i.e. at go-live or start date), and what will change later.
  • Stop the bombardment of one-off email communications about individual aspects of the integration; instead, rely on a weekly rolled-up update (e-newsletter format preferred) that provides everything managers need to know about what’s happening when, and action items. Another version could go to all employees.
  • Equip executive leaders and managers to deliver key messages /information to their employees, always providing clear “actions required” of both the managers and the employees.
  • Align with union contract negotiation timing and politics; fully clarify what applies to each group.
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Kadlec Regional Medical Center in southeast Washington; we integrated all employees there into Providence HR, IT and other systems/services in 2015.

December 27, 2016 Posted by | Acquisition Communications, B-to-B Case Studies, Change Management, Corporate Communications, Employee Integration, health care communications, healthcare integrations, IT Process Change, My Career | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

My Top 10 List: Resistance to Organizational or Process Change

Two lists here. First, the top five for implementation of major technology change in a healthcare setting, for physicians and other clinicians.

  1. Fear of the unknown
  2. Dislike time commitment to get training, practice, become proficient
  3. Fear of looking incompetent amidst peers
  4. Concern about disruption to operations (patient care)
  5. Resistance to standardization (workflows, clinical content, order sets, etc.)

All of these reasons (above) relate to other industries also. Next, five other reasons for resistance that can round out my all-industry “Top 10.” (Thanks to Robert Tanner’s blog for input on this.)

  1. Loss of status or job security within the organization (believe they will be harmed by change)
  2. Non-reinforcing reward systems
  3. Peer pressure (protect the department or group)
  4. Climate of mistrust (bad history with implementations and other change)
  5. Organization politics (some have personal motives)

May 7, 2015 Posted by | Change Management, Corporate Communications, IT Process Change | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment