Strategic Outreach

Managing Change Via Communications

Communication tactics during integration of hospitals and medical groups: Lessons Learned, part II

This is the second installment of my mini-series on what I’ve learned from directing internal communications during integration of hospitals and medical group organizations.  My previous post focused on strategy  – this one tackles tactical components.

As integration of employees begins, I create an initial communication with “What’s changing, what’s not.”  We ask managers to deliver it and discuss it with their staff;  supporting FAQs, talking points, and timeline overview reference tools are essential.

Allow as much lead time as possible to prepare this communication. Timing is tricky – it’s a balance between getting it out early enough to alleviate staff angst and confusion, and late enough that most change factors and go-live timeframes have been solidified, to make it as meaningful and helpful as possible.

After this initial overview communication becomes available, move quickly to a bi-weekly and then weekly roll-up update for managers and senior leadership. Consider a second version for all staff that has fewer updates (i.e. only those requiring action by staff as opposed to managers).

Other proven tactical tools:

  • Supply “at a glance” overviews of milestones and dates (via a checklist) for quick reference by core leaders and staff.
  • Reminders (in updates) should be a balance of verbal from managers, visible posted notices, and intranet – with minimal reminders pushed via email, except for inclusion in the weekly roll-up update.
  • Hold monthly drop-ins at the facility – informal, with HR and IT project managers/execs on hand to answer questions. These sessions expand awareness, reduce confusion and build comfort level.
  • Age-old big-organization challenge: making sure important time-sensitive communications get to staff clinicians. Respect time-sensitivity as related to needed actions or impact on staff, especially payroll changes. It may not always be possible to fit notices into the cadence of the e-newsletter updates.

 

January 5, 2017 Posted by | Change Management, Corporate Communications, Employee Integration, health care communications, healthcare integrations, IT Process Change | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Communications during integration of hospitals and medical groups: Lessons Learned

Here’s what I’ve learned from directing internal communications to manager and all-employee levels during integration of their hospital or medical group organization into our large health care system.  I’ve done two of each.

  • Develop an over-arching communication plan incorporating all HR, IT and other work streams to ensure consistent messaging to impacted populations (theme, tone, format, terminology).
    • Emphasize positive outcome/future for both organizations
    • Acknowledge short-term inconvenience during change (transparency)
    • Establish channel/vehicle for regular updates to leaders/managers
  • Use a consistent message structure that clarifies what will not change, what will change “now” (i.e. at go-live or start date), and what will change later.
  • Stop the bombardment of one-off email communications about individual aspects of the integration; instead, rely on a weekly rolled-up update (e-newsletter format preferred) that provides everything managers need to know about what’s happening when, and action items. Another version could go to all employees.
  • Equip executive leaders and managers to deliver key messages /information to their employees, always providing clear “actions required” of both the managers and the employees.
  • Align with union contract negotiation timing and politics; fully clarify what applies to each group.
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Kadlec Regional Medical Center in southeast Washington; we integrated all employees there into Providence HR, IT and other systems/services in 2015.

December 27, 2016 Posted by | Acquisition Communications, B-to-B Case Studies, Change Management, Corporate Communications, Employee Integration, health care communications, healthcare integrations, IT Process Change, My Career | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Look at the Load

The list of Top 10 types of resistance in the post below is missing one big, fat factor that can squash the whole change-management equation.  The Load.  Major implementations occur in the context of all other organizational priorities competing for resources and people’s attention.  Change is also more fragile and risky if there is a history of bad implementation experiences with lingering memories of all the stress caused by poor planning and execution.

In the health care industry, doctors, nurses and other clinicians have faced a relentless onslaught of change.  Caring for patients every single day is their primary focus, but every time they turn around from the bedside or the exam room, they are confronted with another expectation. Among them, learning new documentation technology (electronic health record, ICD-10, computerized order entry), on top of time-consuming quality, safety and patient satisfaction initiatives, revised workflows and processes – it goes on and on.

Defining the climate for change is essential.  It determines organizational readiness and strategies for multi-layered sponsorship for the change.  And of course it guides the communication strategy – timing, messaging (regarding critical needs and priorities) and frequency.

elephant sits

July 24, 2015 Posted by | Change Management, Corporate Communications | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

My Top 10 List: Resistance to Organizational or Process Change

Two lists here. First, the top five for implementation of major technology change in a healthcare setting, for physicians and other clinicians.

  1. Fear of the unknown
  2. Dislike time commitment to get training, practice, become proficient
  3. Fear of looking incompetent amidst peers
  4. Concern about disruption to operations (patient care)
  5. Resistance to standardization (workflows, clinical content, order sets, etc.)

All of these reasons (above) relate to other industries also. Next, five other reasons for resistance that can round out my all-industry “Top 10.” (Thanks to Robert Tanner’s blog for input on this.)

  1. Loss of status or job security within the organization (believe they will be harmed by change)
  2. Non-reinforcing reward systems
  3. Peer pressure (protect the department or group)
  4. Climate of mistrust (bad history with implementations and other change)
  5. Organization politics (some have personal motives)

May 7, 2015 Posted by | Change Management, Corporate Communications, IT Process Change | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Employee Integration After Acquisition – the Communications Factor

Underestimate the impact of an acquisition on the employees of the acquired organization at your own risk and peril. Just because an employee will continue to do their same job after integration, doesn’t mean that things don’t change in their work world. Often it’s dozens of things – their health & welfare benefits, retirement savings, life insurance, pay date and other HR services (or HR self-service). Their email, information and collaboration networks probably change also. Angst festers due to uncertainty, as employees wonder if their role will continue long-term within the new organization, especially if it’s a larger, more complex organization.

As your people move from being an employee of Company A to an employee of Conglomerate ABC, well-strategized communications are needed to avoid confusion, skepticism and negative perceptions about the change. This series of blog posts will explain what worked for us during the integration of 1,280 clinicians and support staff, plus about 900 affiliated physicians, at a prestigious hospital that became a part of our 33 hospital, 5-state health care system.    

The Kick-Off Strategy – Spell Out What’s Changing, and What’s Not

It is imperative to kick off the integration with a substantive communication from executive leadership that spells out what’s changing, and what’s not changing for the employee. Do this before the integration begins impacting everyone. Effective sponsorship of the change requires multiple levels of management to be actively supportive and involved, but the process starts with executive leaders. They need to not only endorse the change initiative, but also communicate its importance and the resources they have ensured are behind it.

Allow as much lead time as possible to prepare this communication. Timing is tricky – it’s a balance between getting it out early enough to alleviate staff angst and confusion, and late enough that most change factors and go-live timeframes have been solidified to make it as meaningful and helpful as possible.

The emphasis in all communications to managers and staff groups should be on the positive outcome and future for both organizations, but there should be acknowledgement of the challenges and short-term inconvenience during the change. Transparency is key.

November 25, 2014 Posted by | Acquisition Communications, Change Management, Corporate Communications, Employee Integration | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment