Strategic Outreach

Managing Change Via Communications

Length Matters

If you let your CEO send an emailed announcement to everyone with over 600 words, readership will not be optimum. But the low-readership penalty for 800 words or more is harsher. If you think that the only result will be that the employee may merely skim it or stop reading after the first few paragraphs, think again. They won’t read any of it. They skip it.  Gone.  Most figure they don’t have the time to tackle it, and you’ve just lost the chance to impart any information.

Research shows that if most readers look at a page with 8 or 9 dense paragraphs of type, their willingness to read it at all goes down significantly, compared to a communication of 5 paragraphs. This is especially true when major change is swirling around your organization and people are time-stressed.

Here’s what the experts recommend, and I can attest to this advice based on my own experience:

Target length is 400 words. This will take the average reader two minutes to read. So given the 3-second average time people spend previewing “general distribution” work emails, 100 words is even better. Some internal communicators aim for 300 words.

You simply can’t let a long communication go out to staff levels that, for example, explains a re-organization in detail and then profiles four or five new leaders and their roles. You should, instead, just summarize the re-org and the “why,” then link to their profiles in deeper content/resources on your intranet.

You’re looking at about 285 words in this blog post, so a 300 to 400 word target for your internal communication is not much longer.  My next post will look at research on optimal sentence and paragraph length.

yard-stick

January 20, 2017 Posted by | Change Management, Corporate Communications, health care communications, healthcare integrations, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Communication tactics during integration of hospitals and medical groups: Lessons Learned, part II

This is the second installment of my mini-series on what I’ve learned from directing internal communications during integration of hospitals and medical group organizations.  My previous post focused on strategy  – this one tackles tactical components.

As integration of employees begins, I create an initial communication with “What’s changing, what’s not.”  We ask managers to deliver it and discuss it with their staff;  supporting FAQs, talking points, and timeline overview reference tools are essential.

Allow as much lead time as possible to prepare this communication. Timing is tricky – it’s a balance between getting it out early enough to alleviate staff angst and confusion, and late enough that most change factors and go-live timeframes have been solidified, to make it as meaningful and helpful as possible.

After this initial overview communication becomes available, move quickly to a bi-weekly and then weekly roll-up update for managers and senior leadership. Consider a second version for all staff that has fewer updates (i.e. only those requiring action by staff as opposed to managers).

Other proven tactical tools:

  • Supply “at a glance” overviews of milestones and dates (via a checklist) for quick reference by core leaders and staff.
  • Reminders (in updates) should be a balance of verbal from managers, visible posted notices, and intranet – with minimal reminders pushed via email, except for inclusion in the weekly roll-up update.
  • Hold monthly drop-ins at the facility – informal, with HR and IT project managers/execs on hand to answer questions. These sessions expand awareness, reduce confusion and build comfort level.
  • Age-old big-organization challenge: making sure important time-sensitive communications get to staff clinicians. Respect time-sensitivity as related to needed actions or impact on staff, especially payroll changes. It may not always be possible to fit notices into the cadence of the e-newsletter updates.

 

January 5, 2017 Posted by | Change Management, Corporate Communications, Employee Integration, health care communications, healthcare integrations, IT Process Change | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment