Strategic Outreach

Managing Change Via Communications

Media Relations is not Favor-Mongering

Some companies have a strange view of Media Relations, and the practitioners of the craft that they hire  are always under the gun to get something out of almost nothing.

What if a friend told you: “Yes, I’ve made a career out of asking my relatives for favors and money.  I do it every month, again and again.  In fact, I have to constantly interrupt them if whatever they’re doing doesn’t involve me, and remind them that I need another favor.”

"Just One More Favor."

Sad, to be sure.  Media Relations, when done right, is not at all like this.  It’s about matching insights and resources with the right communications venue, not about calling in favors.

The business and trade publication biz is a tough one these days.  For editors, the workload constantly increases, and the revenues and compensation are typically going down.  Competition is fierce.  So you better have something new and important, backed up with data, if you want them to spend their time (and money) on articulating it for you and getting the information to your marketplace.

You probably aren’t going to have brand new, stunning information that fits this criteria every week. The rest of the time, make yourself available to help out and contribute by answering a question that a publication editor may have.  This will be occasional.

Meanwhile, take advantage of all the other valuable, low-cost or free channels for disseminating your own Thought Leadership content, on-line and otherwise.  And there’s even Advertising.  Yes, remember that thing called Paid Advertising.  More targeted than ever. “Wow, Uncle Dave is actually paying his own way now instead of bugging us.”

Which brings me back to my “asking favors from your relatives” analogy.  If you were then to replace the word “media” and call it “Family Relations,” you’d soon have to remove the word “Relations” because none of your relatives would want to have any kind of relationship with you.

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July 13, 2010 - Posted by | Authenticity, Brand and Reputation, Media Relations | , , , , , , , ,

1 Comment »

  1. Amen and amen.

    Comment by Tina Creguer | July 14, 2010 | Reply


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